When will it get better? A look at how the flu pandemic has affected our doctors

A new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine reveals that while it is too early to declare that the flu is over, there are a few things that we can expect.

The study looked at the flu response rates in healthcare workers who treated patients with flu symptoms, and found that about 60 percent of those who received flu shots during the pandemic had a high response rate.

This indicates that they had a lower risk of having a respiratory illness during the flu season.

This is good news for the healthcare workers in the study, since they were more likely to be able to treat patients with respiratory illnesses.

The other key takeaway from the study is that healthcare workers may not be as prepared to treat the flu symptoms as they once were, and that this is probably due to increased communication between healthcare workers and their patients.

In the past, healthcare workers were able to communicate more easily with their patients, and they may not have as much time to communicate with their healthcare providers.

Another way that the researchers looked at this is that patients may be more likely than their peers to have a respiratory issue during the influenza season.

Researchers believe this could be due to the increased exposure to the flu, the spread of flu-infected viruses throughout healthcare workers, and increased air travel.

It is unknown if this increased exposure is the reason that healthcare professionals are seeing an increase in the flu.

If you or anyone you know needs medical help, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or go to the Australian Red Cross.

If anyone in your family is having a fever or cough, or if you have other symptoms of the flu like:Dizziness, fatigue, cough, sore throat, cough and/or runny nose, call your GP or your local A&E.

If the flu virus is in your blood or body fluids, call an urgent care centre, hospital or doctor.

If there are symptoms that you think you may have, like headache, muscle aches, stomach pain, fever, cough or cough and runny mouth, call a GP or a doctor.

Do not take any of these medicines if you are not already taking them.

This could lead to an increased risk of infection and could lead you to develop a serious infection or worse.

You should talk to your doctor if you think it is safe for you to do so.